Your Job Title Is Not A Reflection Of Who You Are

If you are broke because you put food on the table to feed your family, you are not broke to me. Only a strong person would swallow his pride and take any job he can to provide for his family

Muhammad Ali

Right now, this very minute, there are people all over the world who are not working in their ideal roles. It happens. We don’t always get the job which we have studied or trained for. Even when we do, we can find our progression opportunities very limited despite years of experience.

It’s tough, it’s demoralising and really knocks your confidence. We all have an idea what our ideal career looks like, and put our hopes, dreams, blood, sweat, time and tears into making it happen. But the doors just won’t open for us, and we end up working in McDonald’s instead of Microsoft. Of course, you will be told that you need to increase your knowledge and skills, which will in turn help you to get the job you want. While I completely agree with this, it’s also true that some doors will not open, no matter how well you prepare and how hard you knock.

Job titles really become a problem when you have to introduce yourself to new people. After the initial introductions, you can bet your bottom dollar that you will be asked “what do you do?” If you’re in a job which you love and are passionate about, this is the perfect opportunity to share that with someone new. If, however, your job is something which you have settled on to pay the bills, it can be terrifying.

If you’re not in your ideal job, social situations terrify you because you will have to tell people what you do, and they will judge. It’s sad but true. People judge one another based on where they work and what they have. This, in turn, causes you to lose confidence and lose perspective. Instead of worrying what others will think when you tell them that you work as a cleaner in a hotel, ask yourself;

  • Who are these people and am I likely to see them again?
  • Why am I attaching any importance to their opinions?
  • Do they really care to find out why I am a cleaner and not a lawyer?
  • Why do I need to justify my life decisions to somebody that i’ve just met?
  • Is my job helping me to meet my life’s priorities, regardless of the job title?

The only person you have to justify your job to, is yourself. It is your life after all. If you have had to take any role just to pay the bills and keep a roof over your head, is that really a bad thing? Be grateful that you have a job. Everybody has to start somewhere, and just because you find yourself flipping burgers at McDonald’s today, that doesn’t mean that this is where you have to stay. Turn up on time and work hard, so that you can progress to a supervisory or managerial role. Then, take that experience, and see if you can’t apply it to a new career. Or, start a course of study in your free time that you will give you the knowledge and skills to change careers. It’s largely up to you what you make of yourself.

I know people who were teachers and diplomats in their home countries, only to be forced to abandon everything and flee because of war. They lose friends, family, possessions and social standing, and have to start again in a foreign country as cleaners, porters, sales assistants or anything else they can find. Yet, they don’t beat themselves up and curse their luck. Instead, they approach their job with pride and passion. They understand that they are lucky to have a job at all, and with it they can support themselves and their families. They also understand that their job does not define them as people. We need more of this mentality.

To the university graduates preparing their assault on the job market, you won’t get your ideal job straight away. You will have to start at the bottom, learn your chosen industry inside-out, and work your way up to the job. It’s all part of the process. Nobody will give you a managerial role straight out of college or university. You have to earn it.

As with most things in life, your job is what you make of it. Be grateful that you have a job which pays the bills and allows you to keep a roof over your head right now. If it’s not what you want or where you want to be, stop whining and look at it as a stepping stone. It’s easier to land a new job while you already have a job, than it is to get a job while unemployed.  You are not tied to a particular job forever.

Apply yourself, no matter what the role involves, and seek out any opportunities for personal and professional development. Then, use this to move onwards and upwards, with glowing references. Most of all, though, try to focus on the positives that your current job offers;

  • What does it allow you to do with the wage which you earn?
  • What opportunities or benefits does it offer?
  • How can it be used as a stepping stone to bigger and better?

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